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Housing & Shelter

    Results: 16

  • Homeless Drop In Centers (5)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Housing Authorities (2)
    BH-8300.3000

    Housing Authorities

    BH-8300.3000

    City, county, or state housing offices that provide information about eligibility for and vacancies in the subsidized housing properties that are under their jurisdiction. Housing authorities accept Section 8 applications, provide Section 8 vouchers, make approved Section 8 rental payments and administer public housing communities while in certain rural areas, the housing finance agency may play this role.
  • Housing Counseling (2)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Housing Expense Assistance (1)
    BH-3800

    Housing Expense Assistance

    BH-3800

    Programs that pay current housing bills or finance new living accommodations for people who are otherwise unable to provide for their housing needs. Housing expense assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Housing Search and Information (5)
    BH-3900

    Housing Search and Information

    BH-3900

    Programs that help people to find and select available rental or purchasable housing, commercial lots and/or residential lots which meet their individual needs. Included is information that is available online, in print or in other formats.
  • HUD Approved Counseling Agencies (1)
    BH-3700.3200

    HUD Approved Counseling Agencies

    BH-3700.3200

    Agencies funded by the federal Office of Housing and Urban Development to provide prepurchase and mortgage default counseling, home equity conversion (reverse mortgage) counseling and information about the HUD rent assistance program for current and prospective purchasers and tenants.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing (1)
    BH-7000.4600-450

    Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600-450

    Privately owned rental housing that is made available to low-income individuals and families at reduced rates based on a contract between HUD or the state housing authority and the property owner. Subsidies are paid directly to the owner of the property who then rents units to income-eligible individuals and families. Also included are low-cost or below market rate housing that is operated or sponsored by religious or charitable organizations for the benefit of low-income individuals and families; and rental housing targeted to lower income households that has been purchased, rehabilitated or constructed by developers who are receiving a federal income tax credit under the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program or are participants in other similar affordable housing incentive programs. Some privately owned rental units that were developed or improved with public funds are also required to rent a designated number of units at reduced prices to people who meet low-income eligibility requirements until the federal or state loans are paid. Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations. Included are income-based rental housing where tenants pay rent that is geared to their income; as well as fixed below market rate rental housing where rent is lower than what people would normally pay renting the unit but is based on a specified percentage of the median income for the area rather than on a percentage of an individual's actual income, and tenants may have to be within a specified income range to live there. Rental amounts and the level of "affordability" may vary considerably among programs.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing for Older Adults (2)
    BH-7000.4600-450 * YB-8000

    Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing * Older Adults

    BH-7000.4600-450 * YB-8000

    Privately owned rental housing that is made available to low-income individuals and families at reduced rates based on a contract between HUD or the state housing authority and the property owner. Subsidies are paid directly to the owner of the property who then rents units to income-eligible individuals and families. Also included are low-cost or below market rate housing that is operated or sponsored by religious or charitable organizations for the benefit of low-income individuals and families; and rental housing targeted to lower income households that has been purchased, rehabilitated or constructed by developers who are receiving a federal income tax credit under the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program or are participants in other similar affordable housing incentive programs. Some privately owned rental units that were developed or improved with public funds are also required to rent a designated number of units at reduced prices to people who meet low-income eligibility requirements until the federal or state loans are paid. Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.

    Individuals who are age 50, 55, 60, 62 or 65 or older depending on the minimum age for qualifying as an older adult which varies by program.

  • Rent Payment Assistance (2)
    BH-3800.7000

    Rent Payment Assistance

    BH-3800.7000

    Programs that make rental payments for people who are at risk of eviction without assistance. Also included are rent supplement programs that provide assistance with ongoing monthly rental costs. Rent payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Reverse Mortgage Programs (1)
    LH-4000.7000

    Reverse Mortgage Programs

    LH-4000.7000

    Programs that make an arrangement which allows older adults who have equity in their homes to obtain cash from their homes without selling them in order to pay for home health care and other needed services and avoid institutionalization (or to use for other purposes). The individual may either obtain a reverse annuity mortgage which provides an annual income for the individual and may also include a lifetime tenancy, or sell and lease back his/her home on a basis that guarantees lifetime tenancy. The institution providing the annuity receives title to the house or cash from the sale only when the older person dies or moves away. In the sale-leaseback arrangement, the title to the house is transferred to the lender immediately. Most of these programs provide counseling regarding the general benefits of reverse mortgages, and some may evaluate an individual's personal financial situation and recommend a reverse mortgage if it would be to the person's advantage.
  • Roommate/Housemate Matching Assistance (1)
    BH-3900.7500

    Roommate/Housemate Matching Assistance

    BH-3900.7500

    Programs that help people who need a shared housing arrangement identify others with whom they can share. Included are share-a-home programs which match homeowners and apartment dwellers who want to share their living facilities with compatible individuals who need a place to rent, some of whom may be willing to provide a service (such as cleaning, laundry, grocery shopping, meal preparation, transportation or lawn care) in exchange for all or a portion of the rent. Many share-a-home programs are for older adults or people with disabilities and require that at least one of each matched pair qualify on this basis.
  • Senior Housing Information and Referral (2)
    BH-8500.8000

    Senior Housing Information and Referral

    BH-8500.8000

    Programs that maintain information about retirement residences, residential care facilities and nursing homes, and link older adults who are looking for alternative living options with appropriate independent or supervised living resources.
  • Senior Move Managers (4)
    BH-5000.8000

    Senior Move Managers

    BH-5000.8000

    Programs that help older adults (and others) who are faced with the prospect of moving from one environment to another (particularly those who are downsizing from a family home and moving to a retirement community or smaller residence) cope with the physical and emotional aspects of making the transition. Move managers plan, coordinate and supervise all aspects of a move. They may help people sort through and organize their belongings and decide what to take; determine and coordinate the disposition of articles that will be left behind; develop a timetable for the move; plan for the placement of furnishings and other items in the new space; identify and contact professionals such as moving companies, estate sales companies, storage facilities and realtors who may be required during the relocation process; provide packing materials; pack the individuals belongings; supervise the activities on moving day; and unpack and set up the new home according to the person's wishes, hanging pictures, making beds, connecting electrical appliances and, overall, making the new environment immediately livable.
  • Street Outreach Programs (2)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (3)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Veteran Homes (1)
    BH-8400.9000

    Veteran Homes

    BH-8400.9000

    Programs that provide care on an ambulatory self-care basis for veterans who are limited by age or illness and are not in need of acute hospitalization or skilled nursing services in situations where care in a home setting is either not available or unsuitable.